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Gunpowder Incident
34,00 € *
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The Gunpowder Incident was a conflict early in the American Revolutionary War between Lord Dunmore, the Royal Governor of colonial Virginia, and militia led by Patrick Henry. On April 20, 1775, a day after the Battle of Lexington and Concord, Lord Dunmore attempted to remove the gunpowder from the magazine in Williamsburg, Virginia to a British ship. In early 1775, Dunmore saw rising unrest in the colony and sought to deprive Virginia militia of supplies needed for insurrection. The Second Virginia Convention had elected delegates to the Continental Congress. Dunmore issued a proclamation against electing delegates to the Congress, but did not take serious action. Patrick Henry's "Give me liberty or give me death" speech at the Second Convention on March 23 and the accompanying resolution calling for forming an armed resistance made Dunmore "think it prudent to remove some Gunpowder which was in a Magazine in this place. Dunmore gave a key to Lieutenant Henry Colins, commander of H.M.S. Magdalen, and ordered him to remove the powder.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 25.09.2020
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Hachette UK The Eye of the Reindeer Buch Tasche...
10,94 € *
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THE ALCHEMIST meets THE SNOW CHILD in this beautiful odyssey through the snowy landscapes of northern Finland.Shortly after her sixteenth birthday, Ritva is sent away to Seili - a remote island to the south of Finland. A former leper colony, Seili is now home to 'hopeless cases' - women who have been outcast from society. But Ritva can't understand why her father has allowed her to be taken there, and she longs to be reunited with her little sister.Hope arrives in the form of Martta, a headstrong girl who is a Sami, and who reminds Ritva of her lost mother and her tales - of Vaja the reindeer, the stolen sealskin, and of a sacred drum hidden long ago. When Ritva and Martta decide to escape, there is only one place that calls to them. And so they begin the long journey North, to the land of the Sami, in search of healing and forgiveness...Readers say:'Some books make a lasting impression and I think this is definitely one of them. .. It's a celebration of the human spirit and our connection to nature.' Rosie Evans, Good Reads, 5 stars'I love losing myself in a book & this one is one of those for me. I was transported to the land of the midnight sun.' Lynda, Good Reads 5 stars'It has been one of those books that I have felt I have escaped into, because the setting is so richly described and the story line sweeps you up and carries you along.' setting in Scandinavia and the lands at the top of the world was so well described as to almost be a character in itself and I was fascinated by the details relating to the indigenous people of this region - the Sami - and their way of life.' Bruce Gargoyle, Good Reads, 4 stars

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 25.09.2020
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The demise and survival of utopian communities....
23,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject Sociology - Individual, Groups, Society, grade: 89%, University of British Columbia (Department of Anthropology and Sociology), course: Community Studies, language: English, abstract: 'And me, I still believe in paradise. But now at least I know it's not some place you can look for, cause it's not where you go. It's how you feel for a moment in your life when you're a part of something, and if you find that moment... it lasts forever...' says Leonardo di Caprio at the end of the movie 'The Beach', upon return from a failed utopian island community. This statement, together with the whole movie, expresses a widespread conviction: utopian communities are bound to fail. 'Paradise' is nothing that one can realize in an actual community. If anything, it can be realized as a feeling or a state of mind; but why do we think that way? Do we all feel that there is a sociological law that inevitably leads to the demise of a community that tries to realize the ideal society? Is this point of view empirically provable? These were the questions that intrigued me when I decided to make utopian communities my research topic; or, formulated into a single research question: Is there a single, most important feature or process that led to the demise or survival of former utopian communities?To answer this question, we should first have a brief look at the great field of studies about the various kinds of utopias. This will help us achieve a better understanding and localization of the aspect of utopia we are looking at in this paper (utopian communities). At the same time, it will help us to find a useful definition of the vague and ambiguous term 'utopia' and, more specifically, 'utopian communities'. Subsequently, we will also have a brief look at the history of those communal experiments. After these prefatory remarks, I will introduce Rosabeth Moss Kanter's concept of utopian commitment as a conceptual framework for the exploration of the longevity of utopian communities. Kanter's functional concept is one of the few analytical models in this field. However, its functional approach is not unproblematic. Therefore a brief evaluation of its strengths and weaknesses seems necessary. Finally, I will use Kanter's concept to analyse the developments of a failed utopian community (the Finnish colony of Sointula), which contrasts with a more successful community (the Shaker sect) and, thus, serves to test the concept's validity.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 25.09.2020
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How Things Fell Apart
26,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

In How Things Fell Apart - A Short History of South Africa - 1488 to Present Day, John H. Glover reveals the source of Apartheid and the racial struggles of the indigenous South Africans. Africans, their struggles with the European for political justice and freedom, and their denial of equality in the South Africa Parliamentary system and its society. John used letters written by European South African Politicians to show the fights of the indigenous South Africans and what they were up against, such as Percy A. Molteno, James Rose-Innes, J. X. Merriman, and Sir Alfred Milner, British Governor of Cape Colony, who wrote to Rev. James Green on December 12, 1901: '.As for the indigenous South Africans, one thing which appears to me quite evident is that a distinction must be drawn in the case of the natives between personal and political rights. A political equality of white and black is impossible.in any South African Parliament the interests of the blacks should be specially represented.this could be best done by white men, not elected but nominated for that particular purpose.As regards to personal rights, I hold that those of the natives should be just as clearly defined, and just as sacred as those of the white men. I do not, however, think that they need always be, or ought always to be the same..' How Things Fell Apart - A Short History of South Africa also reveals the indigenous South African politicians such as Walter Benson Rubusana and John Tengo Jabavu, and their struggles to combat political injustice and apartheid.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 25.09.2020
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The Earth Girl and Queen Eliza
3,40 CHF *
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The Earth Girl and Queen Eliza is about the first generation of young adults who grew up on humanity's first space colony. Adeena Frias is the 'Earth Girl' who meets and befriends a group of them, and then the characters act out the answer to this question: how would the residents of a space colony react to the sudden death of their Mother Earth? Fundamentalist religions gain power; there is panic and denial amidst strangely ordinary days, and the characters form loyal, desperate bonds. This is also a story with moments of lightness and humor. Soon a gentle alien queen offers to share her planet with the human refugees, a decision that causes adventure, mayhem, and disaster. In the end, Adeena gains great insight into her life and her place in the natural world. This is how the story begins: People have been asking me to tell my story, and I agree that my memories should be a part of the new nation's permanent records. I hope that the future generations of our new planet will be interested in what I've experienced. So far my life has been a fascinating ride. I lie in bed many nights, sleepless, and marvel at the events that brought me here. I used to daydream about being a famous author, as many people do. I just didn't think I'd become one in quite this way! My name is Adeena Frias. At age sixty, I am the last surviving Human who was any part of ordinary daily life on Planet Earth, although my grandparents were the last real generation of land-dwellers. My existence on Earth was in name only, like a game-player's 'relationship' with his electronic friends on the big surround-screen. I'd never even felt a natural breeze on my face when I lived on Earth. If only my grandparents, instead of me, were around to tell their stories about life on our mother planet. But I am all that is left. How do I begin to tell about the history that I've seen? This is a story about the events I experienced when I was nineteen . . .

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 25.09.2020
Zum Angebot
The demise and survival of utopian communities....
13,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject Sociology - Individual, Groups, Society, grade: 89%, University of British Columbia (Department of Anthropology and Sociology), course: Community Studies, language: English, abstract: 'And me, I still believe in paradise. But now at least I know it's not some place you can look for, cause it's not where you go. It's how you feel for a moment in your life when you're a part of something, and if you find that moment... it lasts forever...' says Leonardo di Caprio at the end of the movie 'The Beach', upon return from a failed utopian island community. This statement, together with the whole movie, expresses a widespread conviction: utopian communities are bound to fail. 'Paradise' is nothing that one can realize in an actual community. If anything, it can be realized as a feeling or a state of mind; but why do we think that way? Do we all feel that there is a sociological law that inevitably leads to the demise of a community that tries to realize the ideal society? Is this point of view empirically provable? These were the questions that intrigued me when I decided to make utopian communities my research topic; or, formulated into a single research question: Is there a single, most important feature or process that led to the demise or survival of former utopian communities? To answer this question, we should first have a brief look at the great field of studies about the various kinds of utopias. This will help us achieve a better understanding and localization of the aspect of utopia we are looking at in this paper (utopian communities). At the same time, it will help us to find a useful definition of the vague and ambiguous term 'utopia' and, more specifically, 'utopian communities'. Subsequently, we will also have a brief look at the history of those communal experiments. After these prefatory remarks, I will introduce Rosabeth Moss Kanter's concept of utopian commitment as a conceptual framework for the exploration of the longevity of utopian communities. Kanter's functional concept is one of the few analytical models in this field. However, its functional approach is not unproblematic. Therefore a brief evaluation of its strengths and weaknesses seems necessary. Finally, I will use Kanter's concept to analyse the developments of a failed utopian community (the Finnish colony of Sointula), which contrasts with a more successful community (the Shaker sect) and, thus, serves to test the concept's validity.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 25.09.2020
Zum Angebot
Pirates, Ghosts, and Coastal Lore
15,90 CHF *
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In 1963, Judge Charles Whedbee was asked to substitute on a Greenville, NC, morning show called Carolina Today while one of the program's regulars was in the hospital. Whedbee took the opportunity to tell some of the Outer Banks stories he'd heard during his many summers at Nags Head. The station received such a volume of mail in praise of his tale-telling that he was invited to remain even after the man he was substituting for returned to the air. 'He had a way of telling a story that really captured me,' said one of the program's co-hosts. 'Whether he was talking about a sunset, a ghost, or a shipwreck, I was there, living every minute of it.' Word traveled as far as Winston-Salem, where John F. Blair proposed to Whedbee that he compile his stories in book form. Whedbee welcomed the challenge, though his expectations for the manuscript that became Legends of the Outer Banks and Tar Heel Tidewater were modest. 'I wrote it out of a love for this region and the people whom I'd known all my life,' he said. 'I didn't think it would sell a hundred copies.' From the very first sentence of the foreword, Whedbee stamped the collection with his inimitable style: 'You are handed herewith a small pod or school of legends about various portions of that magical region known as the Outer Banks of North Carolina as well as stories from other sections of the broad bays, sounds, and estuaries that make up tidewater Tarheelia.' The Lost Colony, Indians, Blackbeard, an albino porpoise that guided ships into harbor-the tales in that volume form the core of Outer Banks folklore. Whedbee liked to tell people that his stories were of three kinds: those he knew to be true, those he believed to be true, and those he fabricated. But despite much prodding, he never revealed which were which. Legends of the Outer Banks went through three printings in 1966, its first year. Demand for Whedbee's tales and the author's supply of good material were such that further volumes were inevitable. The Flaming Ship of Ocracoke & Other Tales of the Outer Banks was published in 1971, Outer Banks Mysteries & Seaside Stories in 1978, Outer Banks Tales to Remember in 1985, and Blackbeard's Cup and Stories of the Outer Banks in 1989. In 2004, the staff of John F. Blair, Publisher, collected 13 of Judge Whedbee's finest stories for Pirates, Ghosts, and Coastal Lore. If this is your introduction to Charles Harry Whedbee, you'll soon understand his love for the people and the history of the Outer Banks. For decades, the folk tales of Charles Harry Whedbee have been available wherever you care to look on the Outer Banks. Their popularity has transcended Whedbee's loyal readership among North Carolinians and visitors from the Northeast and the Midwest. Charles Harry Whedbee was an elected judge in his native Greenville, North Carolina, for thirty-plus years, but his favorite place was the Outer Banks, Nags Head in particular. Whedbee was the author of five folklore collections. He died in 1990.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 25.09.2020
Zum Angebot
The demise and survival of utopian communities....
14,40 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject Sociology - Individual, Groups, Society, grade: 89%, University of British Columbia (Department of Anthropology and Sociology), course: Community Studies, language: English, abstract: 'And me, I still believe in paradise. But now at least I know it's not some place you can look for, cause it's not where you go. It's how you feel for a moment in your life when you're a part of something, and if you find that moment... it lasts forever...' says Leonardo di Caprio at the end of the movie 'The Beach', upon return from a failed utopian island community. This statement, together with the whole movie, expresses a widespread conviction: utopian communities are bound to fail. 'Paradise' is nothing that one can realize in an actual community. If anything, it can be realized as a feeling or a state of mind; but why do we think that way? Do we all feel that there is a sociological law that inevitably leads to the demise of a community that tries to realize the ideal society? Is this point of view empirically provable? These were the questions that intrigued me when I decided to make utopian communities my research topic; or, formulated into a single research question: Is there a single, most important feature or process that led to the demise or survival of former utopian communities?To answer this question, we should first have a brief look at the great field of studies about the various kinds of utopias. This will help us achieve a better understanding and localization of the aspect of utopia we are looking at in this paper (utopian communities). At the same time, it will help us to find a useful definition of the vague and ambiguous term 'utopia' and, more specifically, 'utopian communities'. Subsequently, we will also have a brief look at the history of those communal experiments. After these prefatory remarks, I will introduce Rosabeth Moss Kanter's concept of utopian commitment as a conceptual framework for the exploration of the longevity of utopian communities. Kanter's functional concept is one of the few analytical models in this field. However, its functional approach is not unproblematic. Therefore a brief evaluation of its strengths and weaknesses seems necessary. Finally, I will use Kanter's concept to analyse the developments of a failed utopian community (the Finnish colony of Sointula), which contrasts with a more successful community (the Shaker sect) and, thus, serves to test the concept's validity.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 25.09.2020
Zum Angebot
How Things Fell Apart
14,99 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

In How Things Fell Apart - A Short History of South Africa - 1488 to Present Day, John H. Glover reveals the source of Apartheid and the racial struggles of the indigenous South Africans. Africans, their struggles with the European for political justice and freedom, and their denial of equality in the South Africa Parliamentary system and its society. John used letters written by European South African Politicians to show the fights of the indigenous South Africans and what they were up against, such as Percy A. Molteno, James Rose-Innes, J. X. Merriman, and Sir Alfred Milner, British Governor of Cape Colony, who wrote to Rev. James Green on December 12, 1901: '.As for the indigenous South Africans, one thing which appears to me quite evident is that a distinction must be drawn in the case of the natives between personal and political rights. A political equality of white and black is impossible.in any South African Parliament the interests of the blacks should be specially represented.this could be best done by white men, not elected but nominated for that particular purpose.As regards to personal rights, I hold that those of the natives should be just as clearly defined, and just as sacred as those of the white men. I do not, however, think that they need always be, or ought always to be the same..' How Things Fell Apart - A Short History of South Africa also reveals the indigenous South African politicians such as Walter Benson Rubusana and John Tengo Jabavu, and their struggles to combat political injustice and apartheid.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 25.09.2020
Zum Angebot