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Terroir al Límit »Les Tosses« 2013 2013 Rotwein...
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199,00 € *
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Terroir al Límit... Bei dem enthusiatischen Weinmacher Dominik Huber ist der Name Programm, denn hier wird die hohe Kunst des Terroir-Weins geradezu zelebriert. Alle Weine stammen von hochgelegenen Kleinst-Parzellen, während der gesamten Vegetationsphase greift man so wenig in den Weinberg ein, wie es nur irgend geht. Strikte Handlese in 10-Kilo-Boxen, manuelle Auslese der besten Trauben, Gravitationspresse, schonende Vinifizierung und Ausbau im Fass sind hier selbstverständlich. So entstehen einige der schönsten Priorats überhaupt , nur vergleichbar mit großen Burgundern und den Einzellagenweinen von Mas Martinet. Der Les Tosses stammt von alten Carineña-Reben aus einer 1,2 ha großen Südostlage mit rotem Schiefer 600m ü.d.M in Torroja del Priorat. Ein konzentrierter und kraftvoller Rotwein, aus der Cariñena-Traube von fast 100 Jahre alten Reben, der mit sehr viel Eleganz und Feinheit ausgestattet ist. Mineralische Anklänge von Graphit, betonen die Frische. Moschus, Gewürze, Lakritze und florale, sowie balsamische Noten geben einen ersten Eindruck von der Komplexität und Intensität des Weines. Am Gaumen kraftvoll, mit superfeinen Tanninen und sehr langem, aromatischem Finale. Luis Gutiérrez von Robert Parker's WineAdvocat vergibt stolze 96 Punkte für diesen Wein: \"The top Cariñena is the 2013 Les Tosses, which for Dominik Huber is the pure expression of graphite and cherries, from an ancient plot on black slate soils fermented with full clusters and a short maceration and matured in oak foudres for two years. There was a volatile whiff and that sensation of warm slate that really transported me to the character of the roads in Priorat. There's also something that made me think of iron and raw meat. It's all relative of course, because compared to most other Priorats, this would feel extremely elegant and floral. The palate has even more of that tactile sensation of the graphite, with abundant, albeit extremely fine tannins and showing great balance....

Anbieter: Vinos
Stand: 15.07.2020
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Back Door Alien Encounters , Hörbuch, Digital, ...
9,95 € *
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Landing their ship on the planet Rodeo while screwing their brains out was probably a bad idea, but Zelda and Rollo aren’t sure they wouldn’t do it again. Now the ship needs fixing and the cargo is trashed. When Zelda heads off to see what sort of barter she can work out she finds that some negotiations require a bareback approach to her back door. And just for fun, the trader tosses in a closer-than-close encounter with wazzies. The fuzzy little demons join in the fun and change her views on what double penetration can be.~~~~~ Excerpt ~~~~~I stared at the image of Rodeo, the planet we were approaching, on the large monitor. It was pretty. Most of them are. Truth is, you can’t tell anything by staring at the images of planets unless you have a shitload of special filters, but I like to see the places I’m going to be walking on, get a sense of them, even if it doesn’t mean shit. Hey, it’s just a harmless quirk. Veteran space travelers are entitled to a few quirks.On the other side of our console area, I saw Rollo shuffling his light blue bulk into the navigator’s chair. He grinned and started strapping himself in. “You know, Zelda, this one is going to be a rough entry.”I smiled at Rollo. “Aren’t they all?”“Any entry into an atmosphere is a little rough, but the atmosphere on this planet is what we technical types call lumpy.”“Lumpy, Rollo? Really?”“There are weird swirls distributed randomly throughout the middle regions that contain micropockets of energy. When we hit them it will fuck over our trim and make for a wild ride. Temporary loss of control and all that. Goddamn bouncy, I expect. I bet it makes predicting the weather hell too.” He toyed with some of the nav controls like he knew what he was doing. “Zelda, are you sure you want to put down here?”That made me laugh. “Seeing that the engines won’t get us to another place where they might be repaired…yeah, I kinda think we better. Floating around in 1. Language: English. Narrator: Mia Sloane. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/131311/bk_acx0_131311_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 15.07.2020
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Babbitt - The Original Classic Edition
26,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Sinclair Lewis wrote a series of satires that exposed the hypocrisy of early 20th century America. 'Babbitt' is a snapshot of the life of George F. Babbitt, a somewhat prosperous middle class businessman who lives in Zenith, Ohio. Zenith has a population of 300,000+, and has an active business community. This community has its own rituals and ironclad rules. These rules consist of being one of the gang, being a member of all the right clubs and organizations, and never deviating from the ideals of business and money. These rules cause enormous difficulties for Babbitt when he goes through a midlife crisis at the end of the book and begins spouting liberal ideas and associating with the 'wrong' crowd. This is my first encounter with Sinclair Lewis. I really don't know why I chose to read 'Babbitt' first, as I also have copies of 'Main Street' and 'Arrowsmith'. I think it was the unusual cover of the Penguin edition, which is a picture of a painting called 'Booster' by Grant Wood. To me, that picture IS Babbitt, and I'll always be able to see Babbitt in my head whenever I'm reminded of this book.There really isn't a lot of symbolism here (and the symbolism that is here is pretty easy to decipher) and the prose is much closer to our present day writing and speech. This is brilliant satire, and you'll laugh out loud at many of the situations Babbitt gets himself into. An especially hilarious incident occurs when one of the local millionaire businessmen finally accepts an invitation to dine with Babbitt. The evening goes badly because Babbitt is in a lower social class. Lewis then shows Babbitt going to a dinner at an old friends house who is in a lower class then him. It's hilarious to see the similarities between the two events, and it brings home how class is strictly enforced in Zenith, and by extension, America. Babbitt is a person that I found myself both hating and liking, often within the space of one page. He's ignorant, in that he is a major conformist who often repeats slogans and phrases merely because others in his circle say the same things. He's a namedropper who refers to people he doesn't even know as though they were his best friends. He's also high volume. Babbitt is one of those people we all know who is always boisterous and noisy so they can hide their own insecurities or ignorance. Just when you think you can't stand Babbitt for another second, Lewis tosses in a situation that makes you feel for the man. Babbitt is the boss at a real estate company, and he worries about his employees liking him. When a confrontation arises with one of his salesmen, Babbitt frets and doesn't want to fire the guy, although the rules of business eventually force him to do exactly that. He wants all of his employees to like him. He also feels bad about cheating on his wife while she is away and worries about what his children will think of him when he comes in drunk after a night of carousing. Ultimately, although Babbitt can be a major heel, the reader is almost forced to sympathize with him. This is true especially at the end of the book, when Babbitt renounces his liberal ways and rejoins his old colleagues. His return to the pack is not quite complete, however. Babbitt is changed by his transgression, and has learned a few lessons that he imparts to his son on the last page of the book, thus ending the tale on an upbeat note. This book is both funny and sad, but well worth reading. Sinclair Lewis eventually won Pulitzer and Nobel prizes for his literary endeavors. It's not hard to see why. Recommended.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 15.07.2020
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Babbitt - The Original Classic Edition
13,99 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

Sinclair Lewis wrote a series of satires that exposed the hypocrisy of early 20th century America. 'Babbitt' is a snapshot of the life of George F. Babbitt, a somewhat prosperous middle class businessman who lives in Zenith, Ohio. Zenith has a population of 300,000+, and has an active business community. This community has its own rituals and ironclad rules. These rules consist of being one of the gang, being a member of all the right clubs and organizations, and never deviating from the ideals of business and money. These rules cause enormous difficulties for Babbitt when he goes through a midlife crisis at the end of the book and begins spouting liberal ideas and associating with the 'wrong' crowd. This is my first encounter with Sinclair Lewis. I really don't know why I chose to read 'Babbitt' first, as I also have copies of 'Main Street' and 'Arrowsmith'. I think it was the unusual cover of the Penguin edition, which is a picture of a painting called 'Booster' by Grant Wood. To me, that picture IS Babbitt, and I'll always be able to see Babbitt in my head whenever I'm reminded of this book.There really isn't a lot of symbolism here (and the symbolism that is here is pretty easy to decipher) and the prose is much closer to our present day writing and speech. This is brilliant satire, and you'll laugh out loud at many of the situations Babbitt gets himself into. An especially hilarious incident occurs when one of the local millionaire businessmen finally accepts an invitation to dine with Babbitt. The evening goes badly because Babbitt is in a lower social class. Lewis then shows Babbitt going to a dinner at an old friends house who is in a lower class then him. It's hilarious to see the similarities between the two events, and it brings home how class is strictly enforced in Zenith, and by extension, America. Babbitt is a person that I found myself both hating and liking, often within the space of one page. He's ignorant, in that he is a major conformist who often repeats slogans and phrases merely because others in his circle say the same things. He's a namedropper who refers to people he doesn't even know as though they were his best friends. He's also high volume. Babbitt is one of those people we all know who is always boisterous and noisy so they can hide their own insecurities or ignorance. Just when you think you can't stand Babbitt for another second, Lewis tosses in a situation that makes you feel for the man. Babbitt is the boss at a real estate company, and he worries about his employees liking him. When a confrontation arises with one of his salesmen, Babbitt frets and doesn't want to fire the guy, although the rules of business eventually force him to do exactly that. He wants all of his employees to like him. He also feels bad about cheating on his wife while she is away and worries about what his children will think of him when he comes in drunk after a night of carousing. Ultimately, although Babbitt can be a major heel, the reader is almost forced to sympathize with him. This is true especially at the end of the book, when Babbitt renounces his liberal ways and rejoins his old colleagues. His return to the pack is not quite complete, however. Babbitt is changed by his transgression, and has learned a few lessons that he imparts to his son on the last page of the book, thus ending the tale on an upbeat note. This book is both funny and sad, but well worth reading. Sinclair Lewis eventually won Pulitzer and Nobel prizes for his literary endeavors. It's not hard to see why. Recommended.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 15.07.2020
Zum Angebot